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Managing Directors

  • Ameena Saiyid

    1988-Present

    Ameena Saiyid

    Upon taking over as head of OUP Pakistan in 1988, Ameena became the first woman in Pakistan to head a multi-national. She rapidly built OUP Pakistan’s educational, academic, and reference publishing programme.

    She recruited and.trained editors, designers and illustrators, sales and marketing staff, and expanded OUP operations from Karachi and Lahore to the rest of the country, opening offices in Islamabad, Peshawar, Multan, Faisalabad, and Abbotabad.

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  • Zia Hussain

    1981-1988

    Zia Hussain

    It was during Zia Hussain’s tenure that OUPP completed their 30 years of service in Pakistan. The event was celebrated by re-launching the Concise and Little Oxford Dictionary at new prices. The event was done with much fervour.

  • Charles Lewis

    1978-1981

    Charles Lewis

    It was under Charles Lewis’ command that the Branch took its first serious action against piracy by way of a raid in the Urdu Bazaar area of Lahore. The effects of these actions were felt immediately in the rise of the sales of legitimate Oxford Editions of various school and textbooks.

  • Tim Benbow

    1975-1977

    Tim Benbow

    1975 was the year that Tim Benbow took charge of the OUPP Branch. It was also the year the Branch moved to a more spacious setting in the Haroon House Building. Tim Benbow’s tenure saw the Branch being allowed for the first time to remit profits to the head office, which was an achievement in itself.

  • Anthony Moggach

    1973-1974

    Anthony Moggach

    Born 22nd February 1946, Anthony Moggach took charge of OUPP in October of 1973. Despite his short spell in Pakistan, it was during this time that the Branch witnessed sales increase by 55%, largely due to the success of the Oxford Historical Reprint Series.

  • David Cunningham

    1969-1973

    David Cunningham

    David Cunningham’s four years in Pakistan included taking upon many scholarly endeavour. The Asian Historical Reprint Series was an acclaimed series, the first of its kind. It was also during this time that Pakistan, and consequently OUPP, was divided into two parts. The breakup of Pakistan meant for the branch not only the loss of 45% of its market, but also of old friends and colleagues.

  • Nigel Sisson

    1968-1969

    Nigel Sisson

    Nigel Sisson’s time in Pakistan was not devoid of excitement. It was a period of Martial Law, political upheaval and turmoil, the direct result of which was felt by the Lahore office but affected daily life and business in Karachi and Dacca as well.

  • Edward Fitzgerald

    1967-1968

    Edward Fitzgerald

    Edward Fitzgerald was appointed to take temporary charge of the Branch, with limited powers, for a maximum of one year. Retired from the Army as a Lieutenant-Colonel in one of the Guard’s regiments, he was Assistant Secretary of the Bookseller’s Association, before becoming OUP’s senior London representative

  • Neal Edmond Burton

    1964-1967

    Neal Edmond Burton

    Neil Burton was considered the best man available by the university representatives. After taking charge of the Branch, he was singly responsible for getting then President Ayub Khan’s political autobiography “Friends, not Masters”, a book which put the Press in a much needed lime light.

  • John Rendall

    1956-1964

    John Rendall

    Born in 1928, John Rendall was working as the Manager of OUP in East Africa, when he was told to fly immediately to Karachi. He took charge of OUPP from Phillip Chester at a time when OUPP was still in a critical position financially.

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    1956

    Philip Chester

    Philip J. Chester was given the charge of the office at a critical point and faced many hardships. He was rushed from London to take charge temporarily, starting from the 1st of February 1956. But despite the temporary nature of his appointment, his time in Pakistan had a serious impact on the overall development of OUPP.

  • image07

    1952-1956

    W.F.Jeffrey

    The much preferred candidate for the position of Manager (equivalent to today’s MD), William Frederick Jeffrey arrived in Karachi from Bombay in 1951 after a ‘fiendish sea trip’. Born in 1917, he was described as having taken on the “colour of the country and (was) anxious to establish his career in the country” who knew both “Pakistan and Urdu”.

Ameena Saiyid

1988-Present

Ameena Saiyid

Upon taking over as head of OUP Pakistan in 1988, Ameena became the first woman in Pakistan to head a multi-national. She rapidly built OUP Pakistan’s educational, academic, and reference publishing programme.

She recruited and.trained editors, designers and illustrators, sales and marketing staff, and expanded OUP operations from Karachi and Lahore to the rest of the country, opening offices in Islamabad, Peshawar, Multan, Faisalabad, and Abbotabad. She established a network of nine bookshops in Pakistan, and organized the first nationwide book fair held simultaneously in twenty towns and cities in Pakistan. Today there is no school in the private sector in Pakistan which is not using an Oxford book. Ameena grew the Urdu publishing programme exponentially. In 1997, OUP Pakistan published 37 books in the Jubilee Series on a wide range of subjects on Pakistan Studies to celebrate 50 years of Pakistan’s independence.

Cramped by the small size of a residential house in Karachi from which OUP Pakistan was operating, Ameena bought a two-acre plot in the Korangi Industrial Area and built an office of 40,000 sq ft and a warehouse of 20,000 sq ft. She equipped the new office with SAP, an integrated software solution that revolutionised its business practices in areas such as budget, liquidity control, supply and material management, distribution, customer services and royalties. She put in place global best practices and benchmarks to enable OUP Pakistan to operate at a high level of efficiency. The new office building is a celebration of Pakistani art, crafts and culture in which the works of Pakistani artists and craftsmen are proudly showcased.

In 2005, Ameena became the first woman in Pakistan to be awarded the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE) in recognition of her services to women’s rights, education, democracy, intellectual property rights and Anglo-Pakistan relations. In April 2010, she became the first woman elected to be president of the 150-year-old Overseas Investors' Chamber of Commerce and Industry (OICCI).

Ameena Saiyid

1981-1988

Zia Hussain

It was during Zia Hussain’s tenure that OUPP completed their 30 years of service in Pakistan. The event was celebrated by re-launching the Concise and Little Oxford Dictionary at new prices. The event was done with much fervour.

Ameena Saiyid

1978-1981

Charles Lewis

It was under Charles Lewis’ command that the Branch took its first serious action against piracy by way of a raid in the Urdu Bazaar area of Lahore. The effects of these actions were felt immediately in the rise of the sales of legitimate Oxford Editions of various school and textbooks.

Ameena Saiyid

1975-1977

Tim Benbow

1975 was the year that Tim Benbow took charge of the OUPP Branch. It was also the year the Branch moved to a more spacious setting in the Haroon House Building. Tim Benbow’s tenure saw the Branch being allowed for the first time to remit profits to the head office, which was an achievement in itself.

Ameena Saiyid

1973-1974

Anthony Moggach

Born 22nd February 1946, Anthony Moggach took charge of OUPP in October of 1973. Despite his short spell in Pakistan, it was during this time that the Branch witnessed sales increase by 55%, largely due to the success of the Oxford Historical Reprint Series.

Ameena Saiyid

1969-1973

Daivd Cunningham

David Cunningham’s four years in Pakistan included taking upon many scholarly endeavour. The Asian Historical Reprint Series was an acclaimed series, the first of its kind. It was also during this time that Pakistan, and consequently OUPP, was divided into two parts. The breakup of Pakistan meant for the branch not only the loss of 45% of its market, but also of old friends and colleagues.

Ameena Saiyid

1968-1969

Nigel Sisson

Nigel Sisson’s time in Pakistan was not devoid of excitement. It was a period of Martial Law, political upheaval and turmoil, the direct result of which was felt by the Lahore office but affected daily life and business in Karachi and Dacca as well.

Ameena Saiyid

1967-1968

Edward Fitzgerald

Edward Fitzgerald was appointed to take temporary charge of the Branch, with limited powers, for a maximum of one year. Retired from the Army as a Lieutenant-Colonel in one of the Guard’s regiments, he was Assistant Secretary of the Bookseller’s Association, before becoming OUP’s senior London representative.

Ameena Saiyid

1964-1967

Neil Edmund Burton

Neil Burton was considered the best man available by the university representatives. After taking charge of the Branch, he was singly responsible for getting then President Ayub Khan’s political autobiography “Friends, not Masters”, a book which put the Press in a much needed lime light.

Ameena Saiyid

1956-1964

John Rendall

Born in 1928, John Rendall was working as the Manager of OUP in East Africa, when he was told to fly immediately to Karachi. He took charge of OUPP from Phillip Chester at a time when OUPP was still in a critical position financially.

Ameena Saiyid

1956

Philip Chester

Philip J. Chester was given the charge of the office at a critical point and faced many hardships. He was rushed from London to take charge temporarily, starting from the 1st of February 1956. But despite the temporary nature of his appointment, his time in Pakistan had a serious impact on the overall development of OUPP.

Ameena Saiyid

1952-1956

W.F. Jeffrey

The much preferred candidate for the position of Manager (equivalent to today’s MD), William Frederick Jeffrey arrived in Karachi from Bombay in 1951 after a ‘fiendish sea trip’. Born in 1917, he was described as having taken on the “colour of the country and (was) anxious to establish his career in the country” who knew both “Pakistan and Urdu”.